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Donald Trump launched Trump Models in 1999.Alex Brandon/AP; trumpmodels.com

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One of President Donald Trump’s favorite businesses will go like Trump Steaks, Trump University, Trump Airlines and Asset Magazine: His struggling New York modeling firm, Trump Model Management, has officially told business associates around the world to prepare for its closure, according to an email obtained by Mother Jones.

Over the weekend, Corinne Nicolas, President of Trump Models, informed her industry colleagues of the impending closure of the 18-year-old agency, in which Trump has an 85% stake (according to his latest financial disclosure). ). “The Trump Organization is choosing to exit the modeling industry,” Nicolas wrote in the email. “Following the recent sale of the Miss Universe organization, the company chooses to focus on its core businesses in real estate, golf and hospitality.” (The Trump Organization sold the Miss Universe Organization, which also operates the Miss USA beauty pageant, to talent agency WME-IMG about 18 months ago, following controversy over remarks by the candidate Trump at the time on Mexican immigrants.)

Mother Jones reported last week that the company was on the verge of collapse, and the New York Post confirmed on Friday that Trump’s agency was indeed closing.

In his email, Nicolas did not provide a specific date when operations will cease. Trump Models employees had assured Mother Jones as recently as last Wednesday it was operating normally and the company was “of course” open to new business.

“The company chooses to focus on its core businesses in real estate, golf and hospitality.”

“Trump Models, over its 18 year history, has been incredibly successful and we are immensely proud of the opportunities we have provided to so many talented people,” Nicolas wrote.

Mother Jones reported before the election that Trump’s modeling agency used to employ foreign models who said they violated immigration rules by working in the United States without a work visa. This investigation also detailed how Trump Models forced its recruits to pay exorbitant rent to live in overcrowded housing, while levying a dizzying array of fees and expenses on its talent, which left some models heavily indebted to the agency.

Former Trump model Rachel Blais appeared in this She fashion spread, published in September 2004, while working for the Trump agency without a proper visa. Read Mother Jones‘ full survey here. She

Since Trump’s election, models and staff have shunned his agency. Industry sources said Mother Jones last week that it was a direct result of Trump’s divisive politics, which made his brand toxic in the modeling world.

Recent departures include modeling stars Katie Moore and Mia Kang and veterans Shirley Mallmann and Maggie Rizzer. The rest of Trump Models’ talent must now find new representation at other agencies. Nicolas promised business partners that she “will be there to help you through the process.”

Trump founded his modeling agency in 1999, growing his brand with what would become one of the top modeling agencies in the country. Since his election, ethics experts and others have focused on how Trump could use the presidency to benefit his businesses. At least in the case, his presidency seems to have had the opposite effect.